Batti Mamzelle

Batti Mamzelle were a London-based funk-psych octet comprised of Trinidadian musicians. The band released one album, I See the Light, on Cube Records in 1974. Vocalist Jimmy Chambers hailed from soul-rockers Dada. Percussionists Ralph Richardson and Russel Valdez played the steel drums on “Did You Ever Love Me” from the 1973 Fleetwood Mac release Penguin. Guitarist Winston Delandro partook in the 1971 Afro-Italian soul-funk project African People, which released the album Stop Pushing on Polydor.

Members: Frank Ince, Jimmy Chambers (vocals), Miguel Barradas (vocals), Peter Duprey, Ralph Richardson (percussion), Richard Bailey (drummer), Russel Valdez (percussion), Winston Delandro (guitar)


Batti Mamzelle released their singular album I See the Light on Cube (UK, Italy, Australia) in 1974. The album features 10 originals, including “I See the Light, “Streakin’,” “Lament,” “San Juan,” “Seasoning,” and “Voodoo Man.” The track “Get Out of My Way” was issued as a single. The album was produced by drummer Richard Bailey’s older brother Robert Bailey, himself the former keyboardist of Osibisa.

Richard Bailey was a backing mainstay for Linda Lewis during the 1970s. Immediately after Batti Mamzelle, he joined Gonzalez. He also played on the Jeff Beck albums Blow by Blow and Wired. Further credits include albums by Gary Boyle, Morrissey Mullen, Annette Peacock, Joan Armatrading, Poly Styrene, Ali Thomson, Zahara, Snowy White, and Sniff ‘n’ the Tears. He also played in the Brit-funk acts The Breakfast Band and a later lineup of Incognito.

During the late 1970s, Chambers sang on albums by Chris Rea, Colin Blunstone, Roger Chapman, Amii Stewart, Tony Wilson, and erstwhile Dada collegue Elkie Brooks. In the 1980s, he cut an album with Central Line and guested on tracks by John Miles, The Stranglers, Anthony Moore, Jacqui Brookes, Paul Young, Madness, Microdisney, Wham, and Godley & Creme.

Keyboardist Miguel Barradas reunited with Chambers in Central Line and also recorded with The Pale Fountains.


Discography:

  • I See the Light (1974)

Sources:

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